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Kymulga Bridge & Mill

Southern Gent

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Just outside of Childersburg, AL. The mill and bridge was built in 1864 for Confederate Lt. Colonel George Forney who was killed in the Battle of the Wilderness, in Virginia before construction was completed. The Union Army burned most of the mills in the area but some how missed this one, maybe because of it's out of the way location. Surprisingly advance for it's day, the 4 story mill had not one, but three turbines powering 5 French Buhrs, and providing electricity for the site. Over the years the mill has continued to operate being sold four times till finally in 1988 the Childersburg Historical Society bought the property. They still grind corn for special occasions, but they use electrical power now rather than the turbines.
Built in 1861, the 105-foot (32 m) bridge is one of only two 19th-century covered bridges in Alabama still remaining at its original location.

Kymulga Bridge by William Raber, on Flickr

Kymulga Bridge by William Raber, on Flickr

Kymulga Mill by William Raber, on Flickr
 

RyanB

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Nice bit of history and well captured. Really love the last one of the mill with the splashes of red.
 

Roger S

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Great set. I'm almost positive my friends gave me the tour of that the last time I was visiting in Guntersville.
 

Southern Gent

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Great set. I'm almost positive my friends gave me the tour of that the last time I was visiting in Guntersville.
Possible, but this is close to a 100 miles south of Guntersville.
 

winchestergoose

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A nice bit of history there ,love to know the technical aspects.
 

Southern Gent

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Thanks guys. I love searching out the off the beaten track locations. There are some great locations if you look.

Interesting side note. The bridge across Talledega Creek, connects to the 2nd Federal road constructed in AL. Known as the The Old GA Rd. Congress appropriated $6400 in 1806 to build a 4 ft wide path from Athens, GA to Mobile, AL. Eventually it became a part of a system of roads that would connect Washinton, DC to New Orleans. The increased traffic it brought through the Creek Nation was part of what led up to the Creek War.

Remnanents of the old road still remain at the end of the bridge that are maintained as a walking trail.
 
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